Police and Crime Commissioner Elections: 7 May 2020

This website provides information on the election and the role of the West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner.

Elections – 7 May 2020 – New Information

The Government announced on 13 March that the Local, Combined Authority Mayor and Police and Crime Commissioner elections that were due to take place on 7 May this year will be postponed until May 2021.  We are currently awaiting the detail on this issue, as legislation will now need to be made to postpone the elections for 12 months.  We will provide more details once information becomes clearer.

The Government have advised that the decision was taken following advice from the Government’s medical experts in relation to the response to the Covid-19 virus and the advice of those delivering elections.

Polling stations will be open from 7am to 10pm on 7 May 2020.

How to register to vote

To vote for the West Midlands police area you must live in the West Midlands and be registered to vote by 21 April 2020. If you are over 18 and not registered to vote you can register to vote online. If you are already registered to vote at your address, you do not need to re-register specifically for this election. If you are unsure whether you need to register, you should contact your local Electoral Services Team.

What is a Police and Crime Commissioner?

Police and crime commissioners (PCCs) are elected representatives, the PCC acts as your voice and holds the police force to account. PCCs ensure the police are answerable to the communities they serve. They have the power to hire and fire the Chief Constable.

PCCs do not run the police force at an operational level.  Police and Crime Commissioners were elected for the first time in 2012. They replaced police authorities.

What does a Police and Crime Commissioner do?

Every force area in England and Wales is represented by a PCC, except London and Manchester, where the responsibilities reside with the Mayor.

The West Midlands police force area covers – Birmingham, Coventry, Dudley, Sandwell, Solihull, Walsall and Wolverhampton.

Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) are elected representatives, the PCC acts as your voice and holds the police force to account. PCCs ensure the police are answerable to the communities they serve. They have the power to hire and fire the Chief Constable.

PCCs do not run the police force at an operational level.  Police and Crime Commissioners were elected for the first time in 2012. They replaced police authorities.

The core functions of the West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner:

  • sets the priorities for West Midlands Police in a “Police and Crime Plan”
  • works to understand and respond to public priorities
  • sets the West Midlands Police budget and the part of council tax that goes to policing
  • holds the Chief Constable to account for police performance
  • makes crime and disorder reduction grants
  • works with other partners and agencies to improve community safety

Read more about the roles and responsibilities

How much is the PCC paid?

The West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner’s salary is set by the Home Secretary. It is currently £100,000 per year in the West Midlands.

Is there a Deputy Police and Crime Commissioner?

The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act allows a PCC to appoint a Deputy PCC, but it is not a requirement.  The Deputy PCC is classed as a member of the PCC’s staff, and the PCC sets their terms and conditions of employment.  The role is to support and share the responsibilities and vision of the Police and Crime Commissioner and to help them implement and deliver his Police and Crime Plan.  The PCC can delegate many of their functions to a Deputy PCC.  Deputy PCCs are exempt from the restrictions on political activity that apply to other members of the PCC’s staff, and do not need to go through a recruitment process.  However, they are subject to a confirmatory hearing by the Police and Crime Panel.

What is the Police and Crime Plan?

The law requires all Police and Crime Commissioners to produce a Police and Crime Plan within the first financial year after they are elected. A Police and Crime Plan can last for a PCC’s term of office or be renewed periodically.

The Police and Crime Plan must include:

  • The PCC’s police and crime objectives
  • The priorities for the Chief Constable
  • The resources the PCC will make available to the Chief Constable to provide policing
  • How the Chief Constable will report to the PCC about policing
  • How the Chief Constable’s performance will be measured
  • Information about any crime and disorder reduction grants to be made by the PCC, any conditions made.

What is the Policing Protocol?

The policing protocol describes the role and responsibilities of the PCC, the Chief Constable, the Police and Crime Panel and the Home Secretary. It outlines what each does and how they are expected to work together.  It seeks to define and protect the operational independence of Chief Constables.

What is the Strategic Policing Requirement and collaboration with other forces?

The Strategic Policing Requirement (SPR) sets out the national criminal threats facing the UK and the appropriate national policing capabilities required to counter those threats.  Each PCC and Chief Constable must have regard to the SPR when making decisions about their force.  PCCs and Chief Constables also have a duty to collaborate, requiring them to keep under review opportunities to work with other police forces and organisations.

How long will the PCC be in office?

Four years. The next election is in May 2024.